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  • Tom Thumb steam engine

    I've started on the Tom Thumb steam engine that's in Live Steam magazine. I'll try to past some pictures.Looks like I can't upload unless I change the size of the pictures. Don't know how.Ed

  • #2
    Ed,

    I use a free picture graphic editor called XNVIEW to resize pictures (as well as adjust brightness and contrast) before uploading. It works very well and really helps some otherwise marginal pics.

    Resize to length and height that's around 7-9 inches at maximum side. That's plenty for web visualizing and is very conservative in loading.

    -ed-
    -ed mccamey-
    www.coslar.us
    www.facebook.com/ed.mccamey
    COSLAR RR
    SWLS Member

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    • #3
      Pictures of the frames
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        How I built the pedestals.
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          Ed - may I post a friendly hint for helping you to shoot better flash photos?

          As you can see, many of your photos show strong reflections in the metal - if you need to use flash, frame your subject so that no surface is parallel with the camera (i.e. place your subject at an angle); in this way, the flash's rays wont bounce straight back into the lens!

          Good looking work, please post more about it!
          Greetings,
          J-E

          There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness"...

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          • #6
            Ed,
            The frames are looking great!
            Take your time on the last pedestal to ensure you get correct gear clearance. Bill's dimensions are right on target.
            You might consider adding an oil reservoir to the gear drive pedestal. All the axle bearings can be lubed at their top surface thru the springs. The gear drive axle box will be solid mount.
            I drilled an oil path thru the pedestal that feeds to a brass tube inside the spring. The tube acts as the oil reservoir and it prevents up/down movement of that end of the axle.
            Enjoyed seeing your work! Share more progress...
            TV
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              pictures

              I use something called PAINT.NET for my photos.

              However, as easy as it is to use, I find that my remote camera device (Tim) is even easier...

              HEY TIM ....I NEED A PICTURE OF....(fill in the blanks)...for the article.

              Also, if you have not noticed:

              If you let the steamer get really dirty and don't bother to clean it

              reflections are not a concern!
              Bill Shields
              Living proof that just about anybody can build a working loco...

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              • #8
                Ed,
                Hardest part of building the TT has been learning to use a camera. Bill insisted that the photos's support his copy AND be in focus!
                Tim

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bill Shields View Post
                  If you let the steamer get really dirty and don't bother to clean it reflections are not a concern!
                  Ain't that the truth!

                  Don't ask me how I know...
                  Greetings,
                  J-E

                  There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness"...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks every one for the help. As you are all experts I'll be asking a lot of questions.Question 1 for the 8th pedestal why not have used a 3/8 " piece and silver soldered the part that sticks out instead of milling down a 1/2" piece?If dum question let me know.

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                    • #11
                      Ed,
                      First rule here: No such thing as dumb questions during this discussion. If you have a thought, feel comfortable to share it. If you are unsure of the best approach, ask. There are a lot of ways to go about construction. As you probably noticed, I didn't follow Bill's drawings in some places.

                      Decision to use 1/2" steel was based on time/money. The cost difference between 1/2" and 3/8" isn't significant. It took me less time to mill the piece than it would have taken to set up for soldering. The results are more accurate than I would have achieved if soldered.
                      Tim

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                      • #12
                        8th pedestal

                        Ed:

                        There is no reason why a fabricated piece won't work - or even one screwed together.

                        Since there is no 'real prototype' to follow, as Jiminy Cricket says "let your conscience be your guide". If you are comfortable with soldering up a piece, then by all means.

                        I have intentionally avoided silver soldering during the opening stages of the project, since for many people, getting something to machine tolerances with a soldered assembly is difficult - and may be more work than 'hogging' from solid stock.

                        My construction tree logic was to start simple with basic tools and fabrication, leading to soldered fabrications later as skills advanced.

                        When you see the section on the water pump, you will understand..

                        Then wait until we get to the boiler...

                        Remember - the end-result here is to have something that runs and is fun
                        Bill Shields
                        Living proof that just about anybody can build a working loco...

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                        • #13
                          I've made the 8th pedestal out of 1/2 and it's finished. I just asked the question because I have a lot of 3/8 stock.It was an after thought. My problem is I follow the plans to the letter then after I make a part I think I could have done something else.This is a fun project and I like the way the plans are going seeing as I'm still learning. Thanks again for the replies.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by EdCook View Post
                            This is a fun project
                            That's the most important thing !
                            Greetings,
                            J-E

                            There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness"...

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                            • #15
                              Step one is finished kinda.
                              Attached Files

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